Tagged: Terminal

How to Setup Bash on Windows 10 for Developers – Ultimate Setup

Bash for Windows 10 has been out for almost a year now. It has been incredible for a developer like myself to be able to use Bash natively on a Windows machine! In this article, I’ll show you how I install my main Bash setup for Windows 10.   Requirements Your Windows 10 PC must be running a 64-bit version of Windows 10 Anniversary Update build 14393 or later. To find your PC’s CPU architecture and Windows version/build number, open...

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C++ Libraries: Linking and Compiling

What is the -I, the -L, and the –(little L)? Why am I getting so many errors? What’s going on underneath? C and C++ libraries can be thought of as a conglomeration of functions and new keywords that you are able to use in your code. To truly understand what libraries are made of, we should first refresh on header and source files.   Header and Source File Example Header files contain declarations of functions and variables and often have...

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How to Get Multiple Terminals on Ubuntu Server

Let’s say that you want multiple terminals on an Ubuntu server. If you have ever used the Ubuntu server version of the OS, you should know that it is maneuvered only through the terminal. We had a situation where we didn’t have access to the Internet, so we couldn’t install something like tmux for multi-tasking, and we thought screen was hard to use. We needed multiple terminals, so that we could run multiple commands at the same time! If you...

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How to Use Sublime Text 2 From Terminal on Mac OS

Sublime Text 2? The editor that developers, developers, developers like to use. At the very least, Sublime is a common text editor for the everyday programmer. How can you use Sublime on your terminal? If you’re any programmer, you’re maneuvering through the terminal left and right, all day everyday, so you need to have an easy way to use sublime from the terminal! By default, for Mac OS X, you don’t have Sublime binded to a command on the terminal!...

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8 Steps to Install Cygwin on Windows

Cygwin provides the Linux feeling on Windows. With Cygwin, you can get a sizable Linux collection of GNU and Open Source tools including a terminal that supports POSIX interface on Windows. Step 1) Check whether your System type is 32 bit or 64 bit. If you have Windows 8 or 8.1, right click on This PC on your Desktop, then click on Properties. If you don’t have This PC on your Desktop, you can also use Windows’ search to look...

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